ST SIMON'S PARISH OF PARTICK

WHERE IS IT? In the city's West End, tucked away on Partick Bridge Street, just south of Kelvinhall Underground station

St. Simon’s was opened in 1855 by Father Daniel Gallagher, the priest who explorer David Livingstone credited as teaching him Latin, thus allowing him to qualify to study medicine instead of working in Blantyre’s dye factories.



Father Gallagher originally named his church St. Peter’s, which was the third oldest Catholic Church in Glasgow, after the mother church, St Andrew’s Cathedral, and St. Mary’s in Calton. It was designed and built by Glasgow architect Charles Gordon O’Neill, shortly before he emigrated to Otago, New Zealand. With the dawn of the 20th century and influx of workers to the area, another church, also known as St. Peter’s, was built in 1903 on Hyndland Street, with the original, smaller building on Partick Bridge Street serving as an extension. During World War II, exiled Polish soldiers needed a church, and so St. Peter’s became known as a Polish Church. Shortly after the end of the war, the Archdiocese split the parishes on Dumbarton Road, and so the original church building was changed to St. Simon’s, the original name of the Apostle Peter.



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