ST PETER'S CEMETERY

WHERE IS IT? On the long London Road in Glasgow’s east end, about 15 minutes walk from Celtic Park

St Peter's Cemetery, also known as the Dalbeth Cemetery, this particular one is maintained by the Archdiocese of Glasgow, although it was originally founded on the land of the wealthy Hopkirk clan.



Like many of the city’s burial grounds, St. Peter’s Roman Catholic Cemetery contains the bodies of over 260 servicemen, 111 having lost their lives in the First World War, and 151 in World War II. It also contains an additional screen wall commemorating those who do not have headstones marking their graves.


The land originally belonged to the rich Hopkirk family, bought in 1754 by James Hopkirk, whose father Thomas had been a successful Tobacco Lord, and one of Glasgow’s “Virginia Dons,” in reference to his plantations in America. James named his son after his father, and the younger Thomas Hopkirk went on to become a famous botanist, amassing a stunning collection of flora and fauna at Dalbeth House. One of the buildings in the Botanic Gardens is named after him. In his later life he moved to Ireland to help in geological surveys of the Emerald Isle. Ten years after he passed away in Belfast in 1841, Dalbeth House and its land were sold to the Roman Catholic Church, specifically the Community of the Good Shepherd. They transformed the house into a convent, and a small section of the land into a burial ground, known today as Old Dalbeth. As the cemetery expanded, the larger, more modern section took the name of St. Peter's.



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