RIDDRIE PARK CEMETERY

WHERE IS IT? North-east of the city centre next to Lethamhill Gold Course, where Cumbernauld Road and Royston Road intersect.

Opened in 1901, Riddrie Park Cemetery is one of Glasgow’s largest and sprawling cemeteries. A large contingent of those souls buried there, 350 in total, died during conflict, with 248 of those in World War II.



Part of Section A, which is home to 21 of these war graves, is now shut to the public due to subsidence. The Commonwealth War Graves Commission is planning to build a memorial near to the Cross of Sacrifice in the grounds, to commemorate those buried in the closed section. The entire cemetery is divided in two; the oldest half is at the west where Sections A to E are located, including a small Jewish Section, while the newer side is to the east.


Like many cemeteries in Glasgow, it has been largely uncared for, leaving Mother Nature to her own devices, with fallen trees and overgrown with weeds and grass. The graveyard made the local news in 2011 when council workers misspelt the name of the cemetery on the entrance sign, welcoming people to “Riddire Park.” It must have been a slow news day.



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