POLLOK COUNTRY PARK

WHERE IS IT: South west of the city centre in the Pollokshaws district, bordered by Pollokshaws Road and Barrhead Road

The biggest park in Glasgow by a few square miles, Pollok Country Park lives up to its name, transporting you from the urban landscape into the country wilds, with dense woodlands, gardens, and a bounty of wildlife including some real highland cows.



While it was not officially a public park until 1966, when the land was gifted to the City of Glasgow Corporation by Dame Anne Maxwell Macdonald, it was open to the public in 1911 by her father, Sir John Maxwell. The politician and philanthropist was a keen supporter of the environment and green spaces within cities. He was also a keen art lover and was involved in trying to find a home for Sir William Burrell’s vast collection, which was gifted to the city with the condition they find a suitable home. Although he never succeeded, with his daughter donating the land of Pollok House for use as a country park, the City was able to build the Burrell Collection museum on its grounds.


In addition to the wildlife walks through the park and along the river, the park features a large play area for children, woodland treks, orienteering courses and mountain bike circuit.



The land, covering some 146-hectares, was once the largest urban green space in Europe. The grounds were originally one vast estate attached to Pollok House, which belonged to the wealthy Maxwell family. The home had been in their family for seven centuries. Dating back to 1752, the old Pollok Country House has been perfectly preserved, and is often regarded as Glasgow’s most elegant home. The gardens are equally well-maintained, featuring a small garden maze. The rear of the house faces onto the White Cart Water, and an old sawmill can still be found next to the water. Next to this horse stables, which are still in use. The stables are built on the site of an old castle, named Nether Pollok Castle. It was in fact the third castle to be built in the estate and lasted from 1500 until 1882 when it was gutted by fire. The first castle was built on the banks of the river in 1160, while the second was built on higher ground by the first of the Maxwells around 1270.


While it was not officially a public park until 1966, when the land was gifted to the City of Glasgow Corporation by Dame Anne Maxwell Macdonald, it was open to the public in 1911 by her father, Sir John Maxwell. The politician and philanthropist was a keen supporter of the environment and green spaces within cities. He was also a keen art lover, and was involved in trying to find a home for Sir William Burrell’s vast collection, which was gifted to the city with the condition they find a suitable home. Although he never succeeded, with his daughter donating the land of Pollok House for use as a country park, the City was able to build the Burrell Collection museum on its grounds.


In addition to the wildlife walks through the park and along the riever, the park features a large play area for children, woodland treks, orienteering courses and mountain bike circuit.



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