PARTICK QUAKER BURIAL GROUND

WHERE IS IT? On Keith Street in the city’s West End, just off the main thoroughfare of Dumbarton Road

Tucked away in a tiny patch of land in Partick, squeezed in next to modern red brick houses, is the Quaker burial ground, possibly Glasgow’s smallest burial ground.



Marked by a black iron railing that could be mistaken for a private garden, the site was gifted to the Society of Friends, better known as the Quakers, in 1711 by a local man named John Purdon, whose family have a nearby street named after them. The first person that was believed to have been buried in the grounds was Purdon’s wife Meg. The Christian group used the burial ground for nearly 150 years, with the last body buried there in 1857.


One of the reasons the Quakers may have abandoned the site could have been religious intolerance, a problem which still haunts Glasgow to this day. At the time, Partick was predominantly a Protestant area, and it has been suggested that funerals taking place in the grounds were disrupted by locals living in the area known as the Goat, named after the small river (or burn) which still flowed in those days. The grounds fell into the ownership of Glasgow City Council, but seem to be preserved by those living in the neighbouring Keith Court.



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