MARYHILL CHURCHYARD

WHERE IS IT? Northwest of the city centre, on the main thoroughfare of Maryhill Road, opposite the Maryhill train station

The Maryhill Parish Church and its accompanying burial ground were completed in 1826, on land granted to the Church of Scotland by Miss Lillias Graham.



Graham hailed from the Gairbraid Estate and was the daughter of Mary Hill, whom the area was later named after. However, their first minister, the Reverend Robert McNair, left in 1846 to join the newly formed Free Church of Scotland. They left the parish and built their own church, which is now known as Maryhill High Church. Both churches continued separately until they merged in the union of churches in 1929. In 1986, the two congregations were brought under one minister once again, and by 1998, the two were united.


While the Old Parish church survived World War II while bombs dropped around it (a memorial stain glass window was later installed), the same cannot be said of the burial ground. It is now derelict, with many of the stones illegible and broken. It is the subject of legal issues, as the care of the graveyard reverted back to the City Council, and cannot be maintained until these issues are resolved. To make matters worse, almost all of the records were destroyed in a fire in the vestry in 1956. In 1985, an effort led the Glasgow and West of Scotland Family History Society, and edited by J.S. Fairie, saw the graves documented to try and ascertain who was buried there and the inscriptions upon the tombstones.



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