LANSDOWNE PARISH CHURCH

WHERE IS IT? On Great Western Road in Glasgow's West End, across from Kelvinbridge Underground station

Walk east across the Kelvin Bridge on Great Western Road and you will spot the giant spire of Lansdowne Parish Church stretching up into the sky.



It is one of the slimmest spires across Europe, measuring 218 feet (just over 66 metres). It was built in 1863 from a design by prolific Glasgow architect John Honeyman, with stained glass windows provided by father and son team Alfred and Gordon Webster.


Honeyman was a central figure during the mid-19th Century; as well as publishing a number of pioneering papers, including “The Age of Glasgow Cathedral” and “The Drainage of Glasgow,” he was a member of the Institute of Architects in Scotland and co-founder of both the Glasgow Archaeological Society in 1856 and the Glasgow Architectural Society in 1858. Although he had a turbulent career that nearly saw him bankrupt, he eventually formed a fruitful partnership with John Keppie. Their firm would later take on a young assistant, one Charles Rennie Mackintosh. When Honeyman retired in 1901 when it became apparent he was losing his sight, he generously arranged it so Macintosh could buy him out without having to raise any capital. He was helped through his later blindness by his son Herbert, whom he in turn inspired with his love of archaeology to eventually become an architect.



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