KING'S PARK

WHERE IS IT: In the Southside of the city past Rutherglen, in a district also called Kings Park, near Cathcart and Croftfoot

The park for which the area is named after was originally the grounds of a private estate belonging to Aikenhead House, donated to the city by house-building magnate Sir John A Mactaggert.



The house is located in the centre of the park, and was built by Glasgow architect David Hamilton for the merchant and Tory, John Gordon, in 1806. Further additions to the house, including the wings, were also carried out by Hamilton in 1823. More recently, the house was converted into a number of flats in 1986.


The country house was in fact built on the site of a former building owned by James Hamilton, the first Earl of Abercorn and later Provost of Glasgow. In keeping with tradition, he too had been a merchant, and retired a very wealthy man before passing away in 1633. Hamilton’s son James later became the Rector at the University of Glasgow.


It was not until the 1930s that the ground of the house were acquired by the City of Glasgow Corporation, and transformed into a public park. Besides Aikenhead House, the park also features a sundial dating back to 1885. It was originally situated at Douglas Castle in Lanarkshire, but was presented to the park shortly after it opened by the Earl of Home. There is also a walled garden, and various species of tree and plantlife that make the walks serene and relaxing. The park is currently looked after by the Friends of the Kings Park (FOKP) who formed in 2006 to develop the park as a centre for environment education and events.



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