BELLAHOUSTON PARK

WHERE IS IT: South West of the city centre, just off the M8 Motorway near the Shawlands and Ibrox districts

This large parkland not only features a variety of horticultural interest, but is home to a building by Charles Rennie Mackintosh, a dry ski-slope, and plays host to various events throughout the year.



The majority of Bellahouston Park was bought by the City of Glasgow I 1895 for the large sum of £50,000, opening a year later. It was extended in 1901 when further land was purchased from Sir John Maxwell, and again in 1903 when the Ibroxhill estate was also acquired. The first major event to be held there was the 1938 Empire exhibition, which was attended by over 12.5 million people. Although 200 buildings and pavilions were built for the exhibition, only the Palace of Art remains, now used as a Sports Excellence Centre, as well as the granite foundation stone unveiled by King George VI in 1937. As well as various concerts, including Eminem and Kings of Leon, the park has received visits from not one but two Popes. The first was John Paul II in 1982, and the second was Pope Benedict XVI in 2010. To commemorate the latter visit, a Papal Memorial Garden was built in 2011.


One of the park’s stand-out sights is the walled garden, which features a number of plants collected by 19th century botanist Peter Bar, who resided nearby. The park is also home to Charles Rennie Mackintosh’s House of an Art Lover, built from his designs posthumously in 1996.



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